Meet the women of the Omo valley. - photito

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Meet Magantu and her baby girl Bartui from the Mursi tribe. Magantu chose not to pierce her lips for a lip plate like most Mursi women. She does however use the ear plates and makes creative use of the surrounding nature to adorn herself.  Magantu lives in a tiny hamlet consisting of a handful of straw and mud huts. There are other such hamlets nearby, but no villages or towns for hundreds of kilometers. The Ethiopian government has recently opened a very basic and somewhat unhygienic clinic close to Magantu's home. It has a handful of government civil servants who offer medical assistance. The problem is that most of the medicine on offer has a cost, unless it's directly supplied by an NGO (non-governmental organizations).  Magantu, like most other people in her area, owns a couple of cows. The milk from them is used for drinking and to mix with maize into a porridge. Blood from the cow is also drunk for extra strength. Magantu, unlike other Mursi living nearer to towns or water supplies, has no way of earning money. Even selling a cow is impossible since the nearest market is hundreds of kilometers away, and there is no means of transport. Therefore, Magantu simply can't afford the medicine on offer in the clinic.

Meet Magantu and her baby girl Bartui from the Mursi tribe. Magantu chose not to pierce her lips for a lip plate like most Mursi women. She does however use the ear plates and makes creative use of the surrounding nature to adorn herself. Magantu lives in a tiny hamlet consisting of a handful of straw and mud huts. There are other such hamlets nearby, but no villages or towns for hundreds of kilometers. The Ethiopian government has recently opened a very basic and somewhat unhygienic clinic close to Magantu's home. It has a handful of government civil servants who offer medical assistance. The problem is that most of the medicine on offer has a cost, unless it's directly supplied by an NGO (non-governmental organizations). Magantu, like most other people in her area, owns a couple of cows. The milk from them is used for drinking and to mix with maize into a porridge. Blood from the cow is also drunk for extra strength. Magantu, unlike other Mursi living nearer to towns or water supplies, has no way of earning money. Even selling a cow is impossible since the nearest market is hundreds of kilometers away, and there is no means of transport. Therefore, Magantu simply can't afford the medicine on offer in the clinic.

Mursi tribeMurci